Monday, 12 September 2016

ROSE BRIDE - out in the States

I'm thrilled that the sexy third book in my Lust in the Tudor Court series is now out in the States.

You can browse ROSE BRIDE here on Amazon US.






Thursday, 3 December 2015

REBEL BRIDE: out now in the States!

I am thrilled to announce the American edition of REBEL BRIDE has now been published in the States by the wonderful Sourcebooks Casablanca. 


REBEL BRIDE: can Hugh ever hope to tame a woman like Susannah?





Hilary Mantel meets Sylvia Day: the second installment in a deliciously erotic trilogy begun in Wolf Bride, set against the sumptuous backdrop of the scandal-ridden Tudor Court by Elizabeth Moss.
HE IS UNDER HER SPELL... 
Hugh Beaufort, favored courtier of King Henry VIII, likes his women quiet and biddable. But Susannah Tyrell is neither of these things. She is feisty, beautiful, opinionated and brave. And Hugh is fascinated by her-despite himself.
When Susannah pulls an outrageous stunt and finds herself lost in the wilds of England, Hugh must go to her rescue. Neither of them is prepared for the dangers that lie in wait. But most deadly of all is their forbidden desire for one another. Hugh has long held himself in check, but even his iron will has its limits as they remain alone together in the forest, far from the restraints of court...
Lust in the Tudor Court
Wolf Bride
Rebel Bride
Rose Bride
Praise for Erotic Romances by Elizabeth Moss:
"Fifty Shades of Tudor sex." -The Sunday Times
"For a terrific historical romance with a couple who can't keep their hands off each other, this is perfect."-RT Book Reviews
"Infused with political intrigue, royal pageantry, infidelity, scandal, historical authenticity, romance and love, this story brings yesteryear to life while heating up the pages and fascinating readers."-Romance Junkies

Sunday, 22 November 2015

WOLF BRIDE PRICE PROMOTION: TODAY ONLY!

I'm delighted to announce a price promotion for my novel WOLF BRIDE for one day only on KINDLE, NOOK and APPLE!

$1.99 US PROMO TODAY!


On Sunday 22nd November, WOLF BRIDE will be on sale in the United States for the reduced price of $1.99 in ebook edition.


You can grab the digital edition of WOLF BRIDE at this lowered price today only at:

AMAZON

BARNES AND NOBLE

APPLE

 WOLF BRIDE

Hilary Mantel meets Sylvia Day: the first installment in a deliciously erotic trilogy, set against the sumptuous backdrop of the scandal-ridden Tudor Court by Elizabeth Moss. 

BOUND TO HIM AGAINST HER WILL...

Lord Wolf, hardened soldier and expert lover, has come to King Henry VIII's court to claim his new bride: a girl who has intrigued him since he first saw her riding across the Yorkshire moors. 

Eloise Tyrell, now lady-in-waiting to Queen Anne Boleyn, has other ideas. She has no desire to submit to a man she barely knows and who-though she is loath to admit it-frightens her more than a little. 

Their first kiss awakens in both a fierce desire that bares them to the soul. But as the court erupts into scandal around the ill-fated Queen, Eloise sees firsthand what happens when powerful men tire of their wives...


Lust in the Tudor Court:
Wolf Bride
Rebel Bride
Rose Bride

Praise for Erotic Romances by Elizabeth Moss:
 
"Fifty Shades of Tudor sex." -The Sunday Times
 
"For a terrific historical romance with a couple who can't keep their hands off each other, this is perfect."-RT Book Reviews
 
"Infused with political intrigue, royal pageantry, infidelity, scandal, historical authenticity, romance and love, this story brings yesteryear to life while heating up the pages and fascinating readers."-Romance Junkies


I apologize that this promotion is not available in the UK.
E. x

Tuesday, 10 November 2015

REBEL BRIDE: out soon in the States

I'm thrilled to announce the forthcoming release of my Tudor romance:
 REBEL BRIDE in the States.

This title will be published on December 1st by Sourcebooks Casablanca.


Hilary Mantel meets Sylvia Day: the second installment in a deliciously erotic trilogy begun in Wolf Bride, set against the sumptuous backdrop of the scandal-ridden Tudor Court by Elizabeth Moss.
HE IS UNDER HER SPELL... 
Hugh Beaufort, favored courtier of King Henry VIII, likes his women quiet and biddable. But Susannah Tyrell is neither of these things. She is feisty, beautiful, opinionated and brave. And Hugh is fascinated by her-despite himself.
When Susannah pulls an outrageous stunt and finds herself lost in the wilds of England, Hugh must go to her rescue. Neither of them is prepared for the dangers that lie in wait. But most deadly of all is their forbidden desire for one another. Hugh has long held himself in check, but even his iron will has its limits as they remain alone together in the forest, far from the restraints of court...
Lust in the Tudor Court
Wolf Bride
Rebel Bride
Rose Bride
Praise for Erotic Romances by Elizabeth Moss:
"Fifty Shades of Tudor sex." -The Sunday Times
"For a terrific historical romance with a couple who can't keep their hands off each other, this is perfect."-RT Book Reviews
"Infused with political intrigue, royal pageantry, infidelity, scandal, historical authenticity, romance and love, this story brings yesteryear to life while heating up the pages and fascinating readers."-Romance Junkies

Monday, 4 May 2015

Fur Mantle, No Knickers: Clothes and the Tudor Woman

In Tudor films, you often see the women slipping easily out of their gowns at bedtime. But in reality, their clothing was a fiendish affair, which would have left modern women ready to scream.

Poor women and lesser gentry might be able to get away with a smock-like one piece gown, pulled simply over the head. But wealthy Tudor woman had to contend with layers of clothing, some of which had to be fastened together as they were put on.

Underwear was, of course, non-existent in the time of Anne Boleyn. 'Drawers' were not worn until much later. So both commoners and high-born ladies would have wandered about fancy-free - which explains, perhaps, how so many women managed to get pregnant at a court where unmarried ladies were watched so closely. It may also explain why husbands like Henry VIII were so possessive and controlling when it came to their wives; with no cumbersome undergarments to negotiate, it would only have taken a few moments alone with a man for intimacy to take place. Assuming the lady in question did not mind being otherwise fully-clothed at the time!

There is not much evidence about early ways of dealing with menstruation, but women in Tudor times probably had a belt that allowed loincloth-style protection involving 'wallops', or rolls of linen, most likely folded. More on that fascinating topic can be found under this post at On the Tudor Trail.


"Draughty today, isn't it?" (Sketch by Hans Holbein the Younger. British Museum.)
The kirtle or foreskirt went over any undergarments, such as a shift, or what we might call a full-length 'slip' today. The kirtle often had a plain back and a highly decorative front panel, especially if the lady's family was wealthy and she wished to demonstrate that with fine and expensive materials. Sometimes the kirtle was already attached to a bodice, but might also be laced into place at the time. The more wealthy the woman, the more complex these laced-on-accessories could be. After all, a well-born lady would have numerous maids to help her get dressed - and undressed again later.

Over the kirtle would be hung an overskirt with a wide V-style opening to reveal the decorative kirtle. In the later Elizabethan era, a hoop or farthingale might be worn below the kirtle to swell it out like a bell. A "bum-roll" was also used to help support this structure and to provide contrast between the narrow waist and chest - helped along by a stiffened or bone-strengthened bodice holding a lady's assets down - and the swaying skirts.


'Psst, one of my sleeves is coming unfastened!" (The Family of Thomas More)
Sleeves were normally separate from the rest of the gown rather than attached, and could be worn in a mix and match way, so that women might have "favourite" sleeves that they used with different gowns. These would normally be tied on with laces or ribbons, or perhaps a thin leather thong for lower-class women. Sleeves tended to be more generous and to drape more in early Tudor times, perhaps helping to keep out the cold in draughty castle rooms. Anne Boleyn could probably have hidden all sorts of nefarious objects up her sleeves, if she so desired!

Later, sleeves were often fitted tighter to the arm, especially at the wrist, but could also be jewelled or trimmed with fine lace or fur, showing off the wearer's wealthy status with gems or lavish trimmings instead of excess material. For a queen's more elaborate outfits, it was not unusual for the sleeves to be so heavy with fur trimmings or jewels, they would need to be sewn on at the time of dressing, rather than simply laced. The stitches would then have to be patiently unpicked by her small army of ladies-in-waiting at the end of the day.

Only imagine the boredom of such a lengthy disrobing ritual, which for a queen in full state regalia might take as long as four hours! And the need for delicacy must have been extreme. Perhaps the literary cliche of lusty gentlemen ripping high-born ladies' bodices off in sheer frustration may not be so far from the truth. Small wonder that a queen like Anne Boleyn had such an entourage of ladies-in-waiting, each with her own special tasks and duties, like Eloise in my novel Wolf Bride.

WOLF BRIDE: US edition
All these expensive clothes would have been stored in chests that accompanied the queen everywhere, including on visits away from her royal palaces, and were guarded zealously by the Keeper of the Royal Wardrobe and his or her assistants. The Keeper was a man during Anne Boleyn's time, but the task more typically fell to women once Queen Mary and Queen Elizabeth were on the throne. Jobs connected to the Royal Wardrobe were highly specialised and experts from outside the court were often brought in or given commissions for upkeep and preparation of special garments. There were 'silkmen', artisans and seamstresses on hand, as well as expert laundry workers, constantly available to deal with royal demand.

Any jewels which snagged and fell off unnoticed while Queen Elizabeth was out walking would be marked down in a Day Book now charmingly known as 'Lost From Her Majesties Back', which was kept religiously by her ladies. Every tiny pearl that disappeared from a sleeve or hem was noted down in this book, presumably allowing replacements to be ordered.

Given how many lost jewels appear in this book, it must have been quite a worthwhile pursuit to follow the queen about on state occasions, hoping to grab any lost jewels as they fell from her gowns, some of which were fairly bristling with expensive jewels - a point made by Janet Arnold in her fascinating book, Lost from Her Majesty's Back (The Costume Society, 1980), which may be available from some university libraries if looking to pursue this topic further.


A shorter version of this post first appeared in 2012 at English Historical Fiction Authors

Monday, 13 April 2015

Five Tips For Writing A Sequel


1. Where To Start
Choosing the point at which you need to pick up your story again in a sequel is a delicate process. It’s best to end each book in a series in a well-rounded way, not on a cliffhanger – though some authors would disagree – so picking up exactly where you left off may not be an option. Consider these qestions: does this opening work for someone who did not read the previous book, and does it contain the seeds of the story ahead?

2. Backstory
If your first few pages are a summary of the plot so far, you will bore everyone, including yourself. Dripfeed information only when required, preferably through dialogue, but especially whenever a new character enters the scene. Never assume the reader has read or remembers your previous books. But keep references to backstory very light, more stage asides than whole paragraphs, and introduce them into the narrative as organically as possible, don’t let them clunk about, knocking the furniture over. Don’t use flashbacks to reveal backstory unless you have an excellent reason for doing so; for instance, because you need to introduce a character that cannot appear any other way at that point in the narrative.

3. Character Development and Continuity
If your main characters have not changed since the start of the series, you need to ask why. Since character development is best revealed through action, have them do something they did in a previous book, but show them experimenting and learning. Keep developments logical and consistent. Early on, briefly touch base with characteristics/plot points familiar from the last book. This allows readers to relax and remember how much they enjoyed your previous story.

4. Plot development and continuity
There are two story arcs in a series. First, your overall arc, which may contain several threads. For my Lust in the Tudor Court trilogy, one of these is: ‘Will Queen Anne Boleyn survive all these accusations of adultery and witchcraft, and keep her head?’ (Spoiler: sadly, no.) The other is each book’s individual story arc. This should reach a satisfactory conclusion in each book. It can carry on to the next, especially if it’s a major sub-plot providing continuity, but it should be seen in a new light in your sequel. Same romance, new circumstances. 

5. Middle and End Books
Middle books suffer from not really having a beginning or an end. But this can make them great! There’s no rush to draw story threads together, so concentrate instead on character development and narrative voice. Conclude your story arc, but leave the ending tantalisingly open to seduce the reader into returning. For end books, hit the ground running and beware having too many endings as each sub-plot concludes. There never feels like enough time in the book of a series. So make the most of each chapter.

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 My Lust in the Tudor Court trilogy, set at the court of Henry VIII and the ill-fated Anne Boleyn, begins with Wolf Bride, out in the States in paperback May 5th. Pre-order from Amazon US here

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An earlier version of this article first appeared on the Romantic Novelists' Association blog in 2013.

Monday, 6 April 2015

Don't Hurt Me: out now in ebook

I am absolutely thrilled to announce that DON'T HURT ME, my dark new contemporary romance, is out in ebook. Although a full-length romance, you can buy this story from any Amazon website for less than a pound or a dollar, which is great value!

Julia is out of her depth with the dangerous thrills Owen Marshall is seeking. She isn't ready to be any man's slave, let alone his cast-off. But stranded in the windswept landscape he loves, can she hope to escape his wolfish attentions without getting hurt?


Find DON'T HURT ME on Amazon UK

Find DON'T HURT ME on Amazon US



DON'T HURT ME is published by Thimblerig Books.